Inside the Workshop: A Place for Everything and Everything in its Place

No two bicycle workshops are quite the same. Some are pristine, super-organized spaces run with a firm hand: everything has a place and everything is in its place. Others look like utter carnage, yet the resident mechanic seems to know where everything lives (he may be the only one who does, however). Some workshops are run as tight as a passport control in an airport, with no unwanted bodies allowed. Others are the friendly heart of a bike shop and a social hub where copious cups of tea and coffee are consumed and the world on and off the bike put right on a daily basis.

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Ideally one should aim to have the best of both worlds, making sure that the workshop is a welcoming but organized space with easily accessible tools and clear floors and workbenches. Having defined areas for each type of job is sensible.

To avoid the environmental hazards that solvents create, ecologically sensitive methods for cleaning components should be adopted wherever possible. New parts washer technology by companies such as RoZone — where carefully chosen bacteria eat the oily deposits — mean we are seeing an end to horribly smelly methods of cleaning and waste management. In addition, the copious numbers of cassettes and chains that an average bike shop or professional race team dumps every year should ideally be separated and recycled. It may seem like a lot of hassle, but it is good practice, and if everyone does his bit, it can and will make a difference.

Professional teams are always on the move, and these days all teams have a mobile workshop in a separate truck. It will contain all the tools they have at the team HQ, with basic power tools and some bench tools also usually included. Not to mention parts washers, jet washers, and all the related cleaning gear.

Wheels and tires are usually the main topic of conversation and debate around the truck. The choice of tires for races is as much up to the mechanic as it is the individual rider.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy Andrews

Yoshiaki Nagasawa’s workshop, Osaka, Japan

In the workshop, compressors have taken over the duties when it comes to inflation, and at the races they are essential. Before the compressor, young apprentice mechanics were brought along to races specifically to pump up the tires. Even with a track pump, inflating 50-plus tires to the correct pressure every day builds strong arms. So now a compressor does the hard part, and the disconnecting hiss of a pump hose is a well-recognized sound in the race pits.

Wheels should hang on dedicated hooks, ideally plastic-coated ones to avoid damage. Bikes should also be stored carefully to ensure that no harm comes to their paintwork and anodized finishes. Space is always at a premium — the more you have the more you use — so being organized will always pay dividends.

The hanging tool board is the true sign of a busy workshop, as finding the right tool in a toolbox can be a little time-consuming. Peg boards with removable hooks are a great idea, as are toolboxes with metal-lined drawers. Over the years we have had the pleasure of visiting many prestigious workshops around the world, and this chapter is a homage to these magical places.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsBike Mechanic is an all-access pass to cycling’s back stage: the team truck, the service course, and the workshop. Through gritty photographs and striking interviews, Bike Mechanic explores the daily lives of the bicycle technicians who keep the pro peloton rolling, no matter the weather, no matter the hour. Bike Mechanic gets you inside the action that most never see, while providing bike tuning tips and time-tested procedures that will make you a better wrench. Buy Bike Mechanic from your local bike shop or bookstore or online from the publisher VeloPress, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, your local bookstore, or Chapters/Indigo.

VeloPress is the leading publisher of books on cycling and bike maintenance and repair.

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Cheap Tools Do Cheap Jobs

You cannot build a bike from scratch or service it properly without high-quality tools. They need to fit precisely and be durable so they wear out slowly and evenly over time.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsTeam mechanics usually have two or three sets of tools: one extensive kit that hangs on the workshop wall, one emergency box for taking in the team car, and often a slightly more comprehensive one that lives in the truck. Good mechanics pride themselves on the tools they have amassed. We hang onto apparatus for years — long after the component it was designed to install or adjust has been consigned to history — because you never know when it might come in handy.

Beyond the basic hex keys, wrenches and screwdrivers, it is vital to ensure you have access to cycling-specific tools when building up a new frame. Bottom bracket bearings will only last if the frame’s threads are tapped and faced properly; headsets will only fit into head tubes that have been milled for the cups or direct-fit bearings to come. Carbon frames and forks need very careful preparation if they are to be assembled safely, so take care to use the correct cutting and preparation tools. Using a tool that isn’t suited to the material is likely to result in frustration, destruction, or both.

It is unwise to assume that a new frame will be problem-free during assembly. Checking frame alignment is highly recommended. All threaded elements on the frame should also be checked to make sure they are clear of paint or debris and also that they are in line. Likewise faces that are destined to meet components such as cups or bearings should be prepared correctly.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy Andrews

After use, all tools should be carefully cleaned before they are put away. This is even more important where cutting tools are concerned. It means they will be ready for their next outing and also that any damage or wear and tear can be more easily monitored and acted upon. When storing cutting tools, it is good practice to hang them after use. If that’s not possible, the next best option is to wrap them in a bit of clean rag, taking care to ensure that the sharp cutting edges do not come into contact with each other or anything else that may damage them.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy Andrews

Tools should be looked after and used for their exact purpose: avoid the temptation to use the head of a pair of cutters as a makeshift hammer. If you visit a shop and see its set of bottom bracket cutters covered in grease, rattling around in a drawer or storage bin, you might want to get your threads chased elsewhere.

In reality your toolkit is never fully complete. As tools wear out with regular use eventually they will need to be replaced.

If you plan to take care of regular service on your own bike, invest in a workstand. Working at the correct height with the bicycle held securely will make a massive difference in the ease with which you can carry out certain tasks.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsBike Mechanic is an all-access pass to cycling’s back stage: the team truck, the service course, and the workshop. Through gritty photographs and striking interviews, Bike Mechanic explores the daily lives of the bicycle technicians who keep the pro peloton rolling, no matter the weather, no matter the hour. Bike Mechanic gets you inside the action that most never see, while providing bike tuning tips and time-tested procedures that will make you a better wrench. Buy Bike Mechanic from your local bike shop or bookstore or online from the publisher VeloPress, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, your local bookstore, or Chapters/Indigo.

VeloPress is the leading publisher of books on cycling and bike maintenance and repair.

Why Bike Mechanics Always Sit on the Back Right

The race cavalcade consists of the team cars, press, sponsors, VIPs, race organization, commissaires, directors, police, and the neutral support. In the Tour de France, you’re looking at a traffic jam of hundreds of cars. The media contingent alone is around 2,500 journalists, some 250 photographers, and more than 50 TV crews. Add in the publicity caravan of around 200 vehicles and logistics crews, technical support, team cars, and trucks, and the carbon footprint of your average World Tour bike race would probably raise more than an eyebrow or two at a climate change conference.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsThe queue of cars at the start line is a formidable sight. The vehicles are crammed with technology — radios, fridges, televisions, and special sunroofs over the rear seats through which passengers can shout. The yellow Mavic cars take second place in the line, just behind the red car of race director Christian Prudhomme. The director and race commissaires have hotlines to all the team cars and the Mavic cars, enabling them to call team vehicles forward to assist a rider. Usually a rider raises a hand or drops back to the commissaire’s car to ask for permission to take assistance from the team vehicle, whether that assistance is taking on bidons and food or dropping off a rain jacket.

Stopping the team car or accelerating through the bunch requires experience, skill, and judgment in equal measure. It also has to be a singularly decisive process: barking orders to another driver would never work. This may be the main reason team directeurs take the wheel themselves.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy Andrews

Most race convoy drivers are ex-racers, and, when you experience the driving up close, it’s easy to see why. Immediate reaction time is necessary to be in control of the situation and react exactly at the moment you are called.

I have sat alongside such drivers when providing mechanical support on cycle races held on circuits and been suitably terrified, but the skills needed in the travelling support rally that follows a Grand Tour are something rather special. I say “rally” with qualified reason: the average driver in the peloton has to be navigator, timing expert, and driver rolled into one. Meals have to be taken at the wheel, conversations completed with one eye on the road. It’s a mass of multi-tasking, all carried out at exhausting speed. The neutral support team does all this, and its members have to be mechanics, too. When you experience the driving up close, it’s easy to see why.

The rules of the road are left at the start line, and the police wave you on to speeds unheard of in built-up areas. It’s pretty remarkable that there aren’t more accidents. Sometimes it’s a miracle that everyone gets home in one piece — near misses are inevitable.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy Andrews

It’s incredible how the support cars manage to get to the finish in one piece, too. These vehicles take pretty much the worst abuse you can give a car, plodding up hills with the clutch frying and then screaming down the other side with the brakes glowing red in the switchbacks. And, like the riders, they have to go through it day after day.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsBike Mechanic is an all-access pass to cycling’s back stage: the team truck, the service course, and the workshop. Through gritty photographs and striking interviews, Bike Mechanic explores the daily lives of the bicycle technicians who keep the pro peloton rolling, no matter the weather, no matter the hour. Bike Mechanic gets you inside the action that most never see, while providing bike tuning tips and time-tested procedures that will make you a better wrench. Buy Bike Mechanic from your local bike shop or bookstore or online from the publisher VeloPress, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, your local bookstore, or Chapters/Indigo.

VeloPress is the leading publisher of books on cycling and bike maintenance and repair.

Wheel Change: A High-Pressure Situation

The wheel change is a pressure situation; practice and a calm approach is essential. It’s the one time that a mechanic can really help his riders during a race. Good changes take a few seconds. Rear wheels and time trial bikes create another set of problems but the essential aim is always the same: to get the change done as quickly as possible.

Bike Mechanic Guy Andrews Rohan Dubash

Calmness is required to achieve this aim — not just from the mechanic, but from the affected rider. Riders know to wave for attention to the commissaire’s car before they stop. They hope that their team car also immediately sees the problem although either way the commissaire will radio to let the squad know that one of its riders has an issue. The rider will stop on the right-hand side of the road, allowing all the team cars, motorcycles, press, TV, and race cars to pass safely to the left.

Bike Mechanic Guy Andrews Rohan DubashIf it’s a rear wheel puncture, the stricken rider will shift his chain into the smallest sprocket to enable the wheel to be removed quickly. If the team car is a ways down the string of following vehicles, he will probably remove the wheel and hold it up in the air for greater visibility. If it’s a team leader who is affected, the action will be even quicker: teammates will drop behind and usually give their own wheel or even bike. This allows the leader to return to the race more quickly — and leaves the domestique behind to receive the service and then endure the long slog back into the race.

During the 2013 Milan–San Remo, Pablo Lastras of the Movistar squad finds himself with a puncture. Time for the mechanics to spring into action. First of all his flatted front Campagnolo Bora wheel is quickly removed and unceremoniously dumped on the road while the new wheel is installed. The mechanic assisting Pablo presumably has to wrestle with the “lawyer’s tabs” on the fork ends — the lips that retain the front wheel should the quick release lever come undone. In the past, many mechanics filed off these tabs to assist quick wheel changes. New legislation from the UCI intends to stamp out this practice, however. Now the mechanics have to reset the quick release correctly. The result will undoubtedly be slower race service.

Once the change is done, it’s time to get the stranded rider on the move as quickly as possible. A push usually helps him on his way. In addition to the mechanic, the directeur sportif will normally have gotten out of the team car. That means that as one finishes up the change and picks up the wheels, the other can push the rider back up to speed. If you look closely at the picture, you can see that Pablo is in a reasonably large sprocket at the back so he can get on top of the gear quickly. If it is a rear wheel puncture, the rider will have to be pushed until he can shift into the correct gear and start pedaling.

Bike Mechanic Guy Andrews Rohan DubashThe moment the rider is clear, the car chases after mechanic Francesco, who thoughtfully collected the flatted wheel. He may have had to run 200 meters down the road to get Lastras back up to full speed.

All this takes a few minutes at most, although it still normally leaves the rider facing a long chase back to the race. Often the rider therefore calls for more service from the mechanic once back up to speed. This could be regarded as a bit of gamesmanship, as invariably there is nothing wrong with the bike, but it allows the rider to hang onto the car and get some needed assistance for the chase. The race judges will usually turn a blind eye if it’s following a crash or puncture, but riders certainly can’t hold on for a free ride all the way.

“Usually, in the car during quiet moments, we chat or talk by radio with the guys in the other Vittoria cars, exchanging information and commenting on the race. But that day we were all tense. It was freezing cold, and the riders were racing in unbelievable conditions. We helped them to dress, to open their energy bars, to shake off the snow from their backs and shoulders. In the car the heating was set to maximum level so my hands were warm enough. And then Lastras of Movistar had a flat — I had no problems and replaced his wheel in seconds. As I pushed to get him started again, I saw his eyes: he was really overwhelmed by the effort, from the cold and from that absurd situation. I saw him again at the Giro this year and he thanked me for that help. I just remember the intense cold, the heavy snowfall, and the tension of it all.” — Francesco Villa, Mechanic Vittorial Neutral Service, on the 2013 Milan-San Remo

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsBike Mechanic is an all-access pass to cycling’s back stage: the team truck, the service course, and the workshop. Through gritty photographs and striking interviews, Bike Mechanic explores the daily lives of the bicycle technicians who keep the pro peloton rolling, no matter the weather, no matter the hour. Bike Mechanic gets you inside the action that most never see, while providing bike tuning tips and time-tested procedures that will make you a better wrench. Buy Bike Mechanic from your local bike shop or bookstore or online from the publisher VeloPress, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, your local bookstore, or Chapters/Indigo.

VeloPress is the leading publisher of books on cycling and bike maintenance and repair.

Every Day Ends with Bike Washing

There is one thing that has always been and remains a part of the daily toil — bike washing.

Aside from team tidiness, repetitive washing has the main benefit of keeping wear and tear to a minimum. With no chance for gunk to build up on the drivetrain or rainy brake goo to trouble the frame tubes, cleaning is quick and easy. Washing a bike that has already been recently cleaned is a lot easier than trying to clean up your winter training bike (see page 261 for details of how to wash your bike in the home workshop).

At the finish of a race, all the team mechanics pitch in to wash the bikes. Most dress in fishing waders or, at the very least, rubber boots. It’s a hectic time, and spillages can happen. It’s all about getting the job done as quickly as possible.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsThe wheels are removed first and washed separately — far away from the powerful degreaser that can soften the tubular glue and even rot away the cotton sidewalls. Cassettes are usually washed over a bucket with a bio degreaser.

The first washing mechanic then usually moves to the drivetrain, degreasing it with a powerful solvent. With a small stiff brush stored in an old drink bottle, degreaser will be worked into the moving parts.

The bike is then passed to the next mechanic who may work over the machine from top to bottom with a bigger brush and some car-washing soap. After that the suds and all the degreasing glop are removed with a power washer. Unless the race has been particularly wet or muddy, the power washer is usually set to a fairly low pressure. At a cyclocross race usually the only requirement is a power washer — the first degreasing step is hardly necessary when the bike is covered with mud.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsOnce the bike is clean another mechanic grabs hold of it as quickly as possible and transfers it into a stand to dry it off and chase away all the water, usually with an air line. All the pivots in the brakes, the gears, and even the rollers in the chain are blasted to make sure no water can begin to rust away any steel parts.

The last mechanic in the line will thoroughly check the bike — especially the brake pads and cables — and will have to replace the rear wheel and run through the gears. After the team bikes are done, the spare bikes may need to go through this process as well, especially if the weather has been bad, and they have been on a team car’s roof rack all day. Finally the team cars, buses, and trucks get a wash, ready to greet the spectators and TV cameras at the start of the next stage.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsBike Mechanic is an all-access pass to cycling’s back stage: the team truck, the service course, and the workshop. Through gritty photographs and striking interviews, Bike Mechanic explores the daily lives of the bicycle technicians who keep the pro peloton rolling, no matter the weather, no matter the hour. Bike Mechanic gets you inside the action that most never see, while providing bike tuning tips and time-tested procedures that will make you a better wrench. Buy Bike Mechanic from your local bike shop or bookstore or online from the publisher VeloPress, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, your local bookstore, or Chapters/Indigo.

VeloPress is the leading publisher of books on cycling and bike maintenance and repair.

The Worst Days for a Bike Mechanic

A mistake by the pro team bike mechanic can cost the team the race

Mistakes can be hard to come to terms with, but, in fairness, in the world of professional mechanics, they are pretty rare. Out on the road with Kris Withington from Garmin, I asked him what the riders gave him the hardest time about.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy Andrews“They don’t. We put the pressure on ourselves and feel it ourselves. I don’t think the riders complain much; they don’t come down here and rip into us directly, but if something goes wrong with the bike, it’s hard. Especially for GC riders like Millar or Christian Vande Velde or last year [2009] Bradley Wiggins.

“Wiggins is pretty cool about it all, but when you hear them on race radio screaming: ‘My fucking bike, my fucking bike, my fucking bike!’ it’s bad for us, sure, but they don’t come down to the truck and rip into us personally.”

“The worst thing is, after a race where something goes wrong, the director comes and says, ‘Hey, what happened there?’ Normally the directors right away support us, and they look at the facts first, but if it’s our fault, it’s tough. But hey, that’s the difference between a mechanic’s job and a soigneur’s job. A mechanic’s job, if you fuck it up, it can actually cost the race. A soigneur can’t really fuck up. I mean, how do you fuck up a massage? And even if you do mess it up somehow, it isn’t going to cost them the race. But cycling’s on TV, and if something happens, it looks bad for us.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy Andrews

 

“Like David Millar’s chain snapping in the Vuelta, that wasn’t very pleasant, although that wasn’t our fault. He was in the break all day, and I was giving him water and Coke all day out of the car, and then five kilometers from the line the chain started ticking, but he didn’t bother to change the bike. We had a bike ready but he thought he’d be all right. And then when they started the sprint, he was going to win the stage easy, then the chain went — bang! And you could see on TV, he chucked the bike — fwoom! And because I was in the second car that day, we were already stuck in the deviation behind the race traffic, so I couldn’t get to Dave to get him his spare bike — so he was just left standing there. Then the other mechanic had to run, and at that stage we were back in the convoy — so he had to run up with someone else’s bike, for him just to cross the finish line. So that was a bad day. Worse was we didn’t know what the problem was. We thought, ‘What the fuck’s going on here?’ So we changed, basically we put a new gruppo on his bike, and Shimano in Japan investigated.

Bike Mechanic Guy Andrews Rohan Dubash

“Finally, it turned out that there had been a bad run of chains. Every Shimano chain has a code on it, so they could check. At the time, though, they thought it was something we’d done, but it wasn’t. We finished work and were at the hotel, and David was sitting at the bar and said to me, ‘Hey, Kris, come on’ — and we had four beers.”

Team Saxo-Tinkoff mechanic Rune Kristensen had a similarly frustrating experience at the 2010 Tour de France, when one of his charges was in the yellow jersey.

“My worst experience was in the Tour 2010 when Andy Schleck lost his chain. We could not do anything — just sit and watch it on the TV in the car. I was in the second car that day. He lost his chain from the big chainring and couldn’t get it back on again; it got trapped, and it took ages to get it back on again. We checked the bike so many times after that day, but we never found what was wrong.”

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsBike Mechanic is an all-access pass to cycling’s back stage: the team truck, the service course, and the workshop. Through gritty photographs and striking interviews, Bike Mechanic explores the daily lives of the bicycle technicians who keep the pro peloton rolling, no matter the weather, no matter the hour. Bike Mechanic gets you inside the action that most never see, while providing bike tuning tips and time-tested procedures that will make you a better wrench. Buy Bike Mechanic from your local bike shop or bookstore or online from the publisher VeloPress, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, your local bookstore, or Chapters/Indigo.

VeloPress is the leading publisher of books on cycling and bike maintenance and repair.

The First Bike Mechanics

There was a time when adjusting a bike needed a lot of tools — even setting up a pair of brakes required hours of patience.

Goggles & Dust

Maurice De Waele changes his own flat during the 1929 Tour de France. Photo from Goggles & Dust, courtesy VeloPress

In the days before lucrative sponsorship deals and huge annual budgets, bike teams had to seek mechanics out as contractors. Race team mechanics were freelancers. They were often hired hands from the bike stores and workshops of a team’s native country, sometimes ex-racers or framebuilders or bicycle factory workers who got an annual summer sabbatical to follow their dreams and their heroes. They had to use their own tools and drive their own cars, which were stuffed with workstands, compressors, solvents, buckets, and brushes. These hired hands followed the teams around from hotel to hotel and set themselves up. The process was hard work in itself and pretty inefficient, but that was the way until the teams started employing mechanics directly.

These days team mechanics have a lot less to lug around to fix the bikes, but there seems to be a lot more material available, too. Team trucks are better resourced, and less has to be fixed on the bike; as much as it might send a thrifty bike fan into despair, the safety of the team riders is paramount, so replacing components is much preferred to keeping things going longer than their service life.

Good team mechanics can make a massive difference in the outcome of a race. Today, pros expect a perfectly prepared bike and a host of high-tech solutions to make it comfortable and efficient. But the art of fixing bikes was once a much more mysterious talent. For example, prior to the 1955 Giro d’Italia, Fiorenzo Magni was frustrated and struggling with knee problems. Somewhat ambitiously, a young Ernesto Colnago persuaded Magni to let him take the bike in for repair. Colnago had noticed that Magni’s cranks were misaligned and running unevenly. He knew immediately that the cotter pins holding the crankset to the axle had to be accurately re-filed for the crank arms to line up perfectly, and he worked hard to perfect the crooked drivetrain. His attention to detail was admirable. Magni’s knees recovered; Colnago was established.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy Andrews

A Rabobank team mechanic adjusts cable routing before the individual time trial

This type of repair was not unusual in the 1950s. Racing bikes of the era required a lot of fine-tuning, and good mechanics like Colnago were highly regarded. Wheels needed constant truing, brakes had to be set up on a daily basis, and gears were constantly on the point of breaking down. Ask any current team mechanics about the tools of their trade, and they will say that they only need a handful of simple ones to keep a modern racing bike on the road. In fact, most days, the bikes just need a wash and some fresh bar tape — serious problems are rare. In Colnago’s day, you needed a watchmaker’s attention to detail and an engineer’s workshop to carry out even the most basic repair, so very few mechanics could cut it on the demanding professional circuit. Colnago’s repairs quickly built him a formidable reputation both in the workshop and at the races. His apprenticeship as a welder at Italian racing bike giant Gloria meant he could build frames, too. Soon many top stars were calling on his services, even those with other bike sponsors. He always worked hard, often staying up all night in his tiny workshop — once to build more than 10 pairs of wheels for a local team the night before a stage race. But Ernesto was more than just a laborer. He had a sickness, an addiction. His creativity and engineering talent meant that his “Wizard” nickname was soon established and his pride in his work rewarded.

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsBike Mechanic is an all-access pass to cycling’s back stage: the team truck, the service course, and the workshop. Through gritty photographs and striking interviews, Bike Mechanic explores the daily lives of the bicycle technicians who keep the pro peloton rolling, no matter the weather, no matter the hour. Bike Mechanic gets you inside the action that most never see, while providing bike tuning tips and time-tested procedures that will make you a better wrench. Buy Bike Mechanic from your local bike shop or bookstore or online from the publisher VeloPress, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, your local bookstore, or Chapters/Indigo.

VeloPress is the leading publisher of books on cycling and bike maintenance and repair.

Bike Mechanic: Tales from the Road and the Workshop

Bike Mechanic by Rohan Dubash and Guy AndrewsBike Mechanic is an all-access pass to cycling’s back stage: the team truck, the service course, and the workshop. Through gritty photographs and striking interviews, Bike Mechanic explores the daily lives of the bicycle technicians who keep the pro peloton rolling, no matter the weather, no matter the hour.

The pro bike mechanics of the UCI World Tour know every secret of the trade, and Bike Mechanic reveals them all—the special tools, the tricks, the roadside repairs at Roubaix and the Tour. The world’s best bike mechanics tell harrowing stories of last-minute fixes and nights spent tuning cutting edge bikes for top performance.

Crisp photography makes Bike Mechanic a tool-lover’s dream, with drool-worthy images of the machinery and equipment that fascinate bike fans.

Bike Mechanic gets you inside the action that most never see, while providing tuning tips and time-tested procedures that will make you a better wrench.

Bike Mechanic: Tales from the Road and the Workshop
Guy Andrews and Rohan Dubash with photography by Taz Darling
Paperback with flaps. Full-color interior with photographs throughout.
7 3/8″ x 9 5/8″, 272 pp., $24.95, 9781937715182, 1937715183

Buy Bike Mechanic from your local bike shop or bookstore or online from the publisher VeloPress, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, your local bookstore, or Chapters/Indigo.

VeloPress is the leading publisher of books on cycling and bike maintenance and repair.